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Register here and get details on the WODs:  https://wcfnorth.frontdeskhq.com/packs/create_or_new?plan_product_id=46744

Every year on New Year’s or New Year’s eve we do a basic, inexpensive, grassroots competition at WCF.  It’s a great chance to hang out with friends, have some fun, maybe even wrap up the year with a PR.  What it’s not:  The CrossFit Games, all about winning, or crushing the competition.  This is about the early days of CrossFit when everyone just got together, worked out hard, then hung out and lied about their Fran times.

This year we’re adding something new:  A great cause.  Many of you know Angie F, she’s been with us for over 4 years.  What you may not know is that she has a son with severe autism.  In a perfect world there would be a ton of resources for parents like Angie but that’s not the case.  In addition to the emotional ups and downs there are also costs many of which aren’t covered by insurance.  So this year half of the small $10 registration fees will go to Angie and all of the money raised day of the event.  I love the United Way and I’m excited to help my church provide clean water in Africa but sometimes it’s also nice to do something a little closer to home.  And it will be FUN!  So sign up tomorrow or over the weekend, get a team mate, and come have some fun with us from 10am-2pm on New Year’s Day.

Here’s what Angie has to say about Jack:

Damon has asked that I tell you about my son, Jack and autism in general. Jack was born
a typical baby and he hit all of his milestones within his first year. You could say to him,
“3, 2, 1 Go!” and he would run across the room and jump in your arms. He would play
and by the time he turned one, he could say mom, dad, and ball. Then when he
was about 15-18 months old, his personality gradually went away. He wouldn’t respond
to my voice, he wouldn’t make eye contact anymore, he refused to be touched and
hugged, he wouldn’t interact, and he couldn’t speak. His words were gone and all that
was left was jumbled noises. His 1st birthday pictures were of this sparkling blue eyed
baby boy, and by the time he was 18 months old, his eyes were vacant. My boy was gone.
I would get little glimpses of him though, like a time Jack wrote out Mozart on the side of
the tub with foam letters, even though he never spoke an intelligible word until he was
almost 5. I knew he was in there but didn’t know how to reach him and I’m still trying to
pull him out to this day. Jack was diagnosed with autism when he was about 2 years old.
We tried any and all early intervention therapies I could find, including changing his diet.
Nothing was bringing him back. Jack is 12 now and is making progress everyday, although it is unlikely he will have a job
or live on his own. He is extremely intelligent (with what interests him) and he is so
funny! Jack can almost talk in full sentences now but it is still very difficult for him. He
also has a violent streak because his lines are blurred with what is right and wrong, and
because of this, he is on first name basis with many Layton and Kaysville Police Officers.
Autism is an epidemic. The CDC states that in 2012, Utah has the highest rate of
children being diagnosed with autism in the Nation at 1 in 47, and 3 out of
4 are boys.  Nobody has found a cause, which makes it nearly impossible to find a cure. Individuals
with autism struggle in 3 areas: Social challenges, communication difficulties, and
repetitive behaviors. There is saying in the autism community,“If you’ve met one person
with autism, then you’ve met one person with autism.”  This is 100% true. Every one
of their challenges is completely different and because these individuals look like normal
kids, we expect that they should act like normal kids. Horrible and judgmental things
have been said to me, my son, and every parent I know who has a child with autism when
they act up in public.  The next best thing to finding a cause or cure for autism is making everyone aware of
autism. How it effects the people who are diagnosed with the disorder and how it effects their families and communities

27/Dec/2013 Friday Coach’s Choice – Classes today 6am, 9am, 5:30pm

3 Rounds for Max Points

5 Minutes Work

1 Minute Rest

5 Minutes Work

1 Minute Rest

5 Minutes Work

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